EQ – Emotional Intelligence

EQ – Emotional Intelligence

The climate or culture in the workplace is integral to an organisation’s performance… By Stephen Hanman, Collaborative Companion I completed my Hay Group Emotional and Social Competency Inventory [ESCI] accreditation in 2012.  Hay research indicates that the link between ESCI and organisational performance is that emotional competency enables flexibility in leadership style, and that this is a 70 percent determinant of organisational climate/culture.  The climate is responsible for 30 percent of organisational performance. Since this accreditation I have conducted about 40 ESCI interventions. As part of these interventions I also completed an Advanced Diploma of Management [ADM]– Emotional Intelligence [EQ].  This ADM is work based, development driven and major project focused. It is a learning by doing methodology. As part of the major project I focused on the development of EQ with a client over a twelve month period. The client’s level of EQ increased significantly over the allotted time! There was clear development in the understanding of personal and professional boundaries and they were much more equipped to manage their stress. As a result, the client observed that he became less angry on a weekly basis, and that his personal relationships were even starting to benefit from this improved state of EQ. The use of this EQ tool has also enabled the development of a number of high performance teams. In one example the improvement of EQ has enhanced the emotional self awareness of a group of 20 participants by conducting a range of activities focused on knowing oneself, knowing the other and building connected relationships that deliver better outcomes. This enables everyone to feel motivated and engaged. Hay Group research found a strong correlation...
Changes In Leadership Styles – Step 3: Pumped-Up Tires

Changes In Leadership Styles – Step 3: Pumped-Up Tires

Step Three – Pumped-Up Tires By Stephen Hanman – Collaborative Companion The Collaborative Wheel (see Step Two – Implementing the Wheel) is now moving forward, with the manager leading from a place of direction, pointing the team in the right direction, but not having to provide all the drive to keep the wheel rolling. The one-to-one connections (see Step One – Connecting the Spokes) are developing strongly, and with every example of collaborative action the morale of the team grows. Each time their collaborative endeavours are a success, it pumps their Collaborative Wheel’s tyres a little more, allowing them to roll faster and faster. This group of colleagues is now becoming a High Performance Team, working more efficiently, meeting and beating deadlines, and enjoying themselves whilst doing it. The manager now moves into the final stage of the Collaborative Leadership Style. The manager now encourages a dynamic and shared leadership style, leaving the center of the circle open for the expert in the field to step into and share their knowledge. The manager is now creating a system of leadership where expertise outranks rank. The manager moves in and out of the center of the circle, stepping out into the circle with everyone and facilitating the expert taking the step into the center when his or her expertise is required. This requires a lot of trust from the manager, allowing themselves to become a part of their team and remaining confident that the communication throughout the team is strong enough to keep their team moving in the right direction. Occasionally, the team may get off course, and it is...
Changes In Leadership Styles – Step 2: Implementing the Wheel

Changes In Leadership Styles – Step 2: Implementing the Wheel

 Step Two – Implementing the Wheel Once independent relationships have been developed between co-workers (see Step One – Connecting the Spokes), these micro-collaborations can start to be connected to each other, so much so that a full wheel of communication is formed around the manager. Team members are now communicating through a one-to-one relationship, interacting with their co-workers from a place of respect or ‘like’, and so connecting the spokes of the wheel to create a circular environment that can begin to roll forward. People begin to be ‘in it for the team’, pushing to reach deadlines in advance so as to accommodate the schedule of a team mate. Once someone has rearranged their own schedule for the sake of the team, the glue holding the collaborative wheel together begins to set, with this commitment and dedication becoming the norm within the team. The role of the manager now begins to change significantly. He or she is now leading in a completely different manner than before. Rather than controlling the information that is passing along the spokes, the manager is now encouraging the circulation of information, sharing the united goals so everyone within the team is aware of the desired outcome. This union within the team begins to create a We, with peers working together to achieved and carry common goals and objectives forward. This momentum begins to push the collaborative wheel forward. Team members are now not only committed to each of their independent relationships, but also to the good of the team and their team’s goals, objectives and aspirations. The next part of Changing Leadership Styles, Step...
Changes In Leadership – Step 1: Connecting The Spokes

Changes In Leadership – Step 1: Connecting The Spokes

By Stephen Hanman – Collaborative Companion Missed Step 0?  Find it here. Step One – Connecting the Spokes The first step in changing leadership styles is to begin to create individual connections between members of the team. People within a team may already have personal relationships with each other, and these people are much more likely to work constructively, self-sufficiently and interdependently. Whilst team members still may not be able to communicate with those on the other side of the team’s circle, they can begin to handle problems and work more efficiently and effectively with those that work either side of them. How? Not only are they cutting out the time they would usually have to wait whilst the manager runs information up and down the spokes of their wheel, but they are also respecting each other personally. Why? When you promise a deadline to someone you like, you don’t want to disappoint them. Same goes for other members of the team, once they are communicating face-to-face with each other promises are more likely to be kept. This process can be inhibited if the manager of the team does not want to release the power of knowing and controlling all the information and processes. The manager is still vital to the team, however, as broader information and team and project goals still need to be managed and communicated across the team’s circle and also up the hierarchy. The manager also needs to be aware of – but not control – the general directions within each relationship’s micro-collaboration, and communicate these directions across the team, to ensure that everything is...
Changes In Leadership Styles – Step 0: Wheel-less Spokes

Changes In Leadership Styles – Step 0: Wheel-less Spokes

One of the most pronounced changes that can be made to develop a Collaborative Workplace is a shift in the way employees, teams and projects are managed on a day-to-day basis. by Stephen Hanman – Collaborative Companion Step Zero – Wheel-less Spokes In the generic, hierarchical model that Ian spoke about in the initial workshop with The Red Apple Stack, the manager is at the top. This hierarchy can be redrawn to the wheel-less spokes to the left with the manager entrenched in the middle of their direct reports, with everyone reporting and communicating through the manager. This is management by control. Work process is slow, as information only moves up or down each spoke. The manager then decides who to pass on this information to, making all communications a one-to-one, linear equation. Whilst this system is ran and driven by the manager, who is fundamental in the teams’ success, it is also restricted by any shortcomings that the manager may harbour. For example, a manager may only be able to efficiently direct a maximum of 5 employees, perhaps 8 for an exceptionally competent one. With a team of 10 people things start falling through the cracks.  Alternatively more managers. Greater expense; less value. These smaller teams can be productive – experience has shown us that competent people managed by a competent leader will produce apt results.  The problem is that everyone is working at less than their best. The natural interdependency across the team is not harnessed. It is lost opportunity and the cost of doing business greater than it needs to be. Why not develop a happier,...
Think Feel Do

Think Feel Do

Organisational life is typically full of action and doing, and if we’re lucky the planning process before the action is well thought out. People rarely get time to stop, reflect and assess how the thinking and action feels – is my gut feeling? Why? Because we are too busy doing! So how do we get off this treadmill; out of the rat race? In our collaborative projects we challenge the typical day to day tasks and effort expended. We slow down to go faster. We focus more on the planning process, allocating more time to consider the consequences of each person’s actions. We focus on a process that incorporates an integrated way of being and links the steps of Think-Feel-Do. The Feel in the middle is about emotion and enables congruency and healthy movement between the Think and the Do. Emotion enables motion and movement; does this feel right; will I be able to communicate this action so it is consistent with our organisational strategic intent? Can I say yes to this promise?   The congruence between the Thinking and the Doing is the capability to find the right path. The Feel part of this integrative model can be expressed as ‘eMotions’. By definition this suggests movement, the thought in motion to action. Congruent action requires the feeling as a filter. What will be the consequences of my action if it is different from what I promised? When we get our actions right the first time there is less waste and duplicated effort; we create efficient and effective outcomes. By doing this we also look after each other and...
Don’t Forget That We Have Dreams Too

Don’t Forget That We Have Dreams Too

“Don’t forget that we have dreams too” – Aldo When the bob cat driver, Aldo said this in the third Red Blue simulation exercise we knew we were in for a great ride; certainly on the road less travelled. But now perhaps a road that can be travelled by many. We have been actively engaged in the collaborative workplace space for over 20 years. It would be fair to say it has been the red thread through our working life. For me, it started in 1987 with despair and a question: “This can’t be the best we can be, can it?” I was sitting in the client’s site office, managing the transport for Lysaght Building Industries [BHP Building Products] while employed by Mayne Nickless Ltd. Tension and conflict was a daily reality for the struggling third party logistics contract. I wondered about a soulful workplace? Could this ever exist or does it fly in the face of profit driven private sector activity? That red thread grew over the years and in 2003 I was introduced to the simulation Red Blue. It is an exercise about how adversarial working relationships develop and goes some way to articulating how to build sustainable collaborative relationships.   Unlike the principals and the supervisors of this collaborative design and construction team, the labourers were able to see the bigger picture and had success in the simulation where the two previous groups had failed. When asked why, Aldo, the bobcat driver, said, “You managers have forgotten that we have dreams too”. It was very matter of fact and then he concluded by saying, “You know...
Putting The P in People AND Profit

Putting The P in People AND Profit

So often I experience organisations hellbent on pursuing one or the other. The challenge of our time is to do both simultaneously. Collaborative Enquiry provides the potential to balance the profit and people objectives to deliver sustainable long term success. An environment where strategic aims and people’s development needs are delivered continuously and together. If we work with what is real and present and nurture a culture that deals well with all issues we create the environment where people and profit look after each other. We create high performance teams that deliver on the strategic aims by building cross functional capability. The From Me to We book is about a collaborative design and construction program that was established to nurture loyalty in a bullish market. The outcomes astonished everyone involved. As Ian said, We recently undertook a project in our building company and improved productivity (if building for less is an accurate measure) by between 5 and 7 per cent over four to five years on projects ranging from $5 million to $45 million. What did we do? We treated everyone, from subcontractor principals to labourers as human beings. They responded in an amazing way. Subcontractors and their employees began to trust each other and ”productivity” improved. Of course it was more complex than this, but in essence it is what we did. We behaved ethically, we cut waste and changed lives in a glass half-full way, not by cutting entitlements, sacking people or hunting the lowest price. Collaborative Enquiry can support you if you want to achieve this objective. We start this process by looking at the workplace...